Rules For 50/50 Chances by Kate McGovern

Rules For 50/50 Chances is a unique read. I have never read about the topic of Huntington Disease.

In my biology class, we learned about genetic disorders. One of the dominant genetic disorders that we focused on was Huntington’s Disease. When learning about it, I did feel sympathy for the people suffering from the disease. However, when learning about it, we didn’t go over it great detail. We never learned how badly it affects your life.

Reading Rules For 50/50 Chances, you learn about Huntington’s Disease from a daughter of a victim. You read about it as if you are experiencing the pain firsthand. You realize how brutal people have it.

Seeing Rose watch her mother slowing deteriorate from the disease was heartbreaking. You watch as her mother became something different from who she was. You saw how the disease affected the rest of the family. You witnessed the anxiety that Rose faced when she realized she could find out if she has the trait.

The plot was okay. I loved how family and friend oriented the story was. Rose’s constant battle between whether she should do things was annoying but was related.

The characters were extremely diverse! Not only was there characters of differents races and religions, the story addresses the diversity well. I loved most characters but not Rose. She was a pitiful character. Despite Caleb’s family’s battle with Sickle Cell disease, Rose tried to make him feel inferior to her when it came to messed up genes. Hello, Rose, it is not a competition! Another annoying trait was she never makes up her mind. The story spends chapters going back-and-forth about a single topic.

Overall, the story is enjoyable. It gives you amazing insight into Huntington’s disease.

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